Manage This

The Extensis Community Blog


Everyone in Information Technology has something to celebrate this month!

Extensis has joined forces with the International Association of Information Technology Association (IAITAM) to expand the IAITAM’s educational offerings.

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To help kick off the partnership, Extensis is hosting a webinar about font compliance:  “Fonts? You mean I have to worry about compliance there too?”.

Extensis will be providing training and educational content relating to font management and digital asset management to help IT Managers at the association develop effective solutions.

 

The IAITAM is a global organization that helps individuals and businesses in any aspect of IT Asset Management, Software Asset Management, Hardware Asset Management, and the lifecycle processes supporting IT Asset Management in organizations of every size and industry around the world.

To learn more about the IAITAM and Extensis’ Webinar, click here.

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Interview with Jay Roeder

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When Jay Roeder didn’t know an answer to a math problem in grade school, he did what he knew best: he drew a Ninja Turtle. “I still think that this was the best possible answer to the problem,” Jay told us in an exclusive interview on his work, influences, and upcoming projects. Jay is a freelance illustrator and designer who, like many artists, couldn’t keep himself from making art as a kid. His work is filled with throwback items like boomboxes and Ninja Turtles and we got to talk with him about what drives his nostalgia. He focuses on hand-lettering and has worked with a number of notable brands, including Nike, TV Land, GAP and Monster.com. He is proud to be an obsessed letterer, and he is a big fan of Extensis, retro games, sneakers and coffee. 

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Check out his interview here:

How would you describe your work and your overall aesthetic?

JAY: I love describing my hand-lettering style as embraced imperfection. Being a perfectionist, it was not until I learned how to accept the crooked lines, misaligned type and illegibility that my lettering took on character and interest. As odd as it seems, these imperfections can have just as much craft as perfection. If you look at any great hand lettering artist’s work, you will see these “errors” are not accidents at all.

How have your early influences and/or feelings of nostalgia influenced your work?

JAY: A lot of my art is nostalgia based, and some of that has to do with memories I have of growing up in Minnesota. Things like boomboxes, Nintendo, and Ninja Turtles were a big part of my childhood, which is why I can’t stop drawing them, even in a lot of the work I do today.

 

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How would you describe your journey from a “childhood doodler” to a professional artist with agency and teaching experience?

JAY: While most kids wanted to be firemen or astronauts, I knew I’d pursue a career in the arts at a young age. If you looked at my homework throughout grade school, you would think that every class was an art class because I drew racecars and ninja turtles on virtually everything. I remember one such story when I didn’t know the answer to a math problem, so I simply drew a Ninja Turtle’s head in the answer space – I still think that this was the best possible answer to that problem. When I graduated from college, I worked at several agencies and did hand-lettering in my free time. I posted drawings to my website (www.jayroeder.com) and eventually clients started to reach out with larger projects. Eventually I decided to go out on my own, which has been the best decision I have ever made. I have also stayed in touch with the design department at my alma mater and have taught design classes for them, as an adjunct professor.

How do you balance the work you do with agencies and your personal work?

JAY: Balancing my agency and personal work is one of the most challenging aspects of what I do. So many people imagine the freelance lifestyle as being extremely flexible, but don’t take into account the effects of ceaseless project demands and an always on the clock mentality. Six years ago, when I first started out on my own, I quickly realized that nothing is guaranteed in the world of freelancing. I accepted every project that was presented to me, even if it meant working unhealthy hours. On the verge of burning out, it wasn’t until about 2 years in that I really gained the confidence to say “no” to certain projects and to work with my clients on building out timelines that worked for both parties when possible.

 

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We heard that you’re an Extensis fan! How do you use the software and how has it impacted your work?

JAY: I am a huge fan of Extensis, and specifically Suitcase Fusion. It impacts my work every day, to be completely honest. As someone who prides himself on typography you can see the obvious correlation. Suitcase saves me A TON of time when I’m searching for the right typeface. I also use it as an inspirational tool when I am working on hand-lettering projects that require me to emulate a certain style of font. It’s been a great product that I have used for over ten years.

Whose work are you admiring these days?

JAY: There are so many artists that I admire, but two that stand out are Jon Contino and McBess. There are aspects of both of these artists that I find extremely inspiring, whether it be McBess’s vintage cartoon inspired worlds, or Jon Contino’s ability to combine old and new world aesthetics into his style. Please look into both artists if you haven’t and be prepared to be inspired.

Have any of your commercial projects particularly resonated with you on a personal level? Which ones?

 JAY: Every once and a while a brand that I am a fan of reaches out to do a project. In one such case – Beer Advocate magazine recently had me do the cover artwork for their 10th anniversary issue, which is currently on newsstands so keep your eyes out! Aside from that, I have worked with so many amazing brands, some of which include: Nike, Ray Ban, Facebook, MTV and Urban Outfitters. I absolutely love what I do, and I hope people can see that in my work.

 

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What advice do you have for young designers?

JAY: I few years ago I read an article on Milton Glaser, which had a very simple piece of advice, but great nonetheless. If anyone doesn’t know who Milton is, he’s an icon in the design industry; you’ve probably seen his work, he’s responsible for the “I heart NY” and Brooklyn Brewery logos. The quote was, “Do good work.” I think this simple yet fundamental advice is invaluable and can be a deadly combination when paired up with motivation. If you do good work and work hard, everything else will fall in place. Also, drink lots and lots of coffee.

You’re truly living the dream, having transformed your passion into an admirable career. What’s next for you?

 JAY: I am so fortunate to have a career that is also my passion. The plan is to continue to grow my business and see where it takes me!

Check out Jay’s website: www.jayroeder.com

And follow him on Instagram and Twitter: @jayroeder

 

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Alejandro Lo Celso is the founder and princpal type designer at the font foundry PampaType, the very first digital type foundry in Argentina, which pioneered the latest wave in Latin American type design. PampaType’s broadly recognized and internationally prized designs are handcrafted following visual, rather than mathematical methods. We’re so glad that Alejandro joined us for this latest edition of 4 Questions 4.

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1. How did you originally get interested in typography and design?

Typography is the encounter of design and literature. I’ve always thought that typography was my safe escape from the commercial world of graphic design. But when I recall my family stimuli, I realize it all came naturally. My grandmother had a taste for calligraphy: she used to draw in fine blackletter on all the title pages of my mother and her brothers’ schoolbooks. And she loved literature. My mother became a historian, and now she paints. On the other side, my grandfather was an architect and an artist, and my own father is an architect too, and an urbanist. I find myself playing in between all these universes.

2. What typography trends are you loving most these days?

I’m not particularly interested in trends; they change too quickly. I prefer to think of typography as the materialization of more perennial words. I love books and reading, and I love the idea of creating typefaces that are comfortable to read. On the other hand, a typeface you publish is like a daughter that leaves home and makes her own path. One day she comes back home with a boyfriend… and who knows if you’ll like him.

3. Which of your projects are you most proud of thus far in your career and why?

garonne_specgaronne_expoThere are several. As a teacher I’m proud of having run many workshops and courses in many places. I think I’ve been a privileged apprentice to those experiences. I led the small team that created Garonne, a tailored type system for the city of Toulouse in France. That was a wonderful and quite unusual experience.

In 2013 we were invited by a Mexican art school to put together a large exhibition of our work in type design. The gallery was approximately 2,000 square feet, we had only 14 days to mount it, and had to coordinate the efforts of 20 people who kindly came to help. It was a great success in the end.

PampaType is now growing our type library on a collective basis. A great challenge for me today is taking care of the work of other designers, and trying to help them reach their highest capabilities.

4. Describe your dream project.

That’s a hard question to answer. I guess I don’t really dream of the unreachable, the far beyond. I’m currently working on a type system for the public university here. That is an awesome project that I didn’t imagine I’d ever do, one day. I could say it is a dream project, but actually I am inside the dream!

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Part Three of Creating a Brand Style Guide

Creating a Brand Style Guide Series is written by Pariah Burke, consultant and trainer for creative, publishing, and editorial professionals.

  • Part One: “Why You Need a Media-Comprehensive Brand Style Guide.”
  • Part Two: “Defining and Creating Your Logo Uses”
  • Part Four: (coming soon)

 

In the Previous Installment

In the previous installment, Part 2: “Defining and Communicating Your Logo Uses,” you learned to think of your logo in terms of an asset that must be protected through strict usage and placement rules. You created different versions, color spaces, and formats to account for its use in any situation and medium, including print, on the Web, in ePUB and fixed-layout ePUB, video, and other media. You learned how to manage and organize your different logo editions for easy access by any teammate, partner, or client, as well as how to communicate logo usage guidelines and proper treatment for each rendition of the logo right within the logo file itself. You learned to document through text and visuals rules required sizes, placements, and spacing around the logo, alignment of the logo relevant to specific surrounding elements, and other common brand style guide requirements for consistent logo application.

 

Equating Color with Your Brand

Depending on your business, what it does, what it stands for, color may be an important visual element of your brand or the most vital.

Coca-Cola owns several truly iconic trademarks such as the flowy script of its logo, the shape of the classic Coke bottles. As valuable as those pieces of intellectual property are, none is more so than the color Coca-Cola Red. It’s a registered trademark color vigorously protected in every country in the world. Few people on Earth don’t instantly connect and equate that unique and almost ubiquitous shade of crimson with Coca-Cola, even when the color is far removed from a can, bottle, or white swoosh.

Where would Barbie be without her signature pink? Mary Kay and T-Mobile are also identified by their own unique, trademarked hues of pink. What could brown do for you if it wasn’t so intrinsic to the UPS brand? Millions of people start their days with the signature green aprons, cups, and wrappers of Starbucks. More aprons, this time in orange, even more readily identify the Home Depot brand. The list of brand-crucial colors stretches on, across all industries.
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Is your team frequently slowed down by font issues?

When used properly, a font server can help your team stay on task and productive.

Join me for a live demo and complete overview of Universal Type Server.

  • Date: Thursday, December 8th, 2016
  • Time: 11:00 a.m. Pacific; 2:00 p.m. Eastern

I will show you:

  • How Universal Type Server meets your team’s font management needs
  • How to install and configure Universal Type Server
  • How to manage users and fonts
  • How to track your team’s font licensing
  • Best strategies for font organization

Register for the webcast.

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What does it take to reign supreme?

Garlic, onions, bell peppers, tomatoes, hot sauce, garlic, chili powder, kidney beans, garlic, pepper, cumin, garlic. Ok, ok. We know garlic is generally a key ingredient, but we also know that nine of Extensis’ “iron chefs” used more than that when they brought their best chili recipes to the ultimate taste test for the 2016 Extensis Chili Cook-Off.

So, what does it take to win?

A unique blend? A perfect union of savory and spice? More beans, less meat? More meat, less beans? Add corn? Plus potato? All of the above? Out of our nine contestants, all Extensis employees, every single chili seemed to have a different take on what makes a winning chili, but all nine varieties were delicious.

And the winner is…hold on. Not so fast. Before the winner is announced, you need to know what makes a winning chili here at Extensis.

Crockpots at Extensis

It starts with a good nose/aroma

Before 9 am, all nine crockpots were plugged in. By 9:30 am, the whole lobby was filled with the smell of chili goodness. By 10 am, we were already hungry.

Make it interesting

They say variety is the spice of life. From Pork and Greens, to Spicy Turkey and from Elk to pineapple vegetarian (getting name), we weren’t short of creativity which made choosing a top chef even harder.

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Every crockpot was numbered so participants were kept anonymous.

Preparation is key

As the crockpots warmed, chefs added more spice, stirred their chili, and tasted their masterpieces.

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Make it the tastiest

At noon, the Extensis Chili Cook-Off began. The lounge was filled with people and bowls began filling with chili…taste by taste.

Whose chili reigns supreme

By 1 pm, employees voted for their favorite chili. Chicken Enchilada? Well, Pork Chili Verde had a nice twist. Spicy Turkey was unique and delicious while the pineapple vegetarian was awesome, but we had to pick one. The winner is…

Elk Chili!

Extensis Cook-Off Winner

Jim Kidwell, Extensis chili cook-off winner, showing off his apron

 

Jim Kidwell, Sr. Product Marketing Manager, made his famous Elk Chili. It had a smoky flavor that won taste testers over. Congrats Chef Kidwell! Jim won an apron and an Amazon gift card.

Coming in a close 2nd and 3rd were Spicy Turkey and Meat Lovers Medley. Extensis would like to thank all chefs for providing their fellow teammates with a delicious lunch. We can’t wait until next year.

Here, at Extensis, we develop font management and digital asset management software and we have a blast doing it. To learn more about what we do and our company culture, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Interested in joining our team? Check out our careers page.

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Alexandra Snowdon‘s love for art and typography began at a young age, and her commitment to learning, traveling, and experiencing the world is reflected in her skilled designs. In 2010 Alexandra launched her own business, Snowdon Design & Craft, which has grown to include two successful online shops that sell her designs, as well as partnerships with independent retailers. We’re glad to share Alexandra’s thoughts on her work, her goals, and traveling around the world to find what really matters. Check out her 4 Questions 4 interview below.

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1. How did you originally get interested in typography and design?

I started off when I was quite young. My grandpa was a commercial artist and I spent a lot of time with him during school holidays. I loved watching him hand-letter posters and signs with brushes and ink. Art was my favorite subject at school, so I was absolutely fascinated with the whole process. He picked up on my interest and encouraged me to follow a creative path, so I have a lot to thank him for. When I got to art college I felt naturally drawn to graphic design because I’ve always loved typography in all its forms. I was only a couple of years into my graphic design career, however, when the whole industry went digital. I began to really miss the hands-on aspect of designing, and felt that I was losing my drawing skills. Years went by and I felt increasingly disillusioned. I took a year off to go traveling in my mid-thirties, and when I got back I decided to go to university part-time, and concentrate on developing my illustration skills. Most of my assignments involved combining lettering and illustration. I soon came to realize that hand-lettering was the thing I did best by far. A couple of years after graduating, I was in a position to leave my graphic design job and become a full-time illustrator and hand-lettering artist. I’ve never looked back.

2. What typography trends are you loving most these days?

It would have to be hand lettering. I think it’s definitely here for the long term. It’s great to have that contrast between clean, sharp, digital fonts and the organic warmth of hand-lettering, with all its flaws and imperfections. In some ways things have come full circle. We live in such a digital world nowadays that anything made with evidence of the human hand has become something special.

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3. Which of your projects are you most proud of thus far in your career, and why?

I think it would have to be the large-scale hand-painted sign I did for a local gallery. It was based on a quote about creativity by Einstein. I did it using chalk paints with the letters painted white on a black background. It was without a doubt the most challenging project I’ve ever worked on. I usually work on quite a small scale, sitting at my desk, drawing and redrawing letters on pieces of paper until I’m happy with them. Then there’s always the option of tidying the work up and making small tweaks digitally until it looks just right. But all that comfort was taken away when I had to paint the letters directly onto the chalkboard, and had only one shot to get it right. I felt sick every time I worked on it, but in a good way. I was pretty happy with the end result! It wasn’t perfect by any means, but it had a lot of character. I think that sums up the essence of hand-lettering: all its kinks and quirks are the very things that give it life.

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4. Describe your dream project.

I’d love to do a book of hand-lettered quotations. A few years ago I set myself the challenge of illustrating one quote every week for 12 months. It was sometimes difficult finding the time to fit it in, but my lettering skills really improved as the year went on. I posted them all on social media, and ended up getting quite a bit of work through them. I’d love to do something like that again.

 

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Font Founders #5: Max Miedinger

As a young man, Max Miedinger (1910-1980) was trained as a typesetter in Zurich, Switzerland. He became a typographer for Globus department store’s advertising studio in 1936. From 1947-56 he was a customer counselor and typeface sales representative for the Haas’sche Schriftgießerei in Münchenstein near Basle. In 1956 Miedinger went freelance when Eduard Hoffmann, the director of the Haas’sche Schriftgießerei, commissioned him to develop a new sans-serif typeface. His typeface Haas-Grotesk was introduced in 1957. But in 1960, the name of the typeface was changed—to Helvetica.

Cool font, Max.

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Part Two of Creating a Brand Style Guide

Creating a Brand Style Guide Series is written by Pariah Burke, consultant and trainer for creative, publishing, and editorial professionals.

Part One: “Why You Need a Media-Comprehensive Brand Style Guide.”
Part Three: “Establishing Consistent Brand Colors Across Media” (coming soon)

Your logo, the harbinger of your brand and without a doubt the most crucial of your brand assets, must be protected through strict usage rules. What are those rules? Where and when do they apply? How do you best communicate those rules for consistent, controlled representation of your brand herald? You’ll answer these questions—and more in Creating a Brand Style Guide, Part 2: “Defining and Communicating Your Logo Uses.”

In the Previous Installment

In Part 1 we defined what brand means and how important it is to define a framework for the consistent, controlled representation of that brand in all media.

Protect Your Logo

Few assets are as important to your business as your logo. Creating the mark that will be the harbinger of your brand goes far beyond having a great design. Ensure it’s protectable by investigating its uniqueness as an identifying mark in your area of business. Original logo artwork may be protected through copyright, but when a design identifies a brand, as your logo does, trademark protection is far more important that copyright. Your logo must be unique and dissimilar from any other trademark or service mark used within the same class or classes of businesses. If it isn’t, you will be infringing on another trademark or service mark. Copyright allows owners to go after infringers and to license some or all rights to the copyright protected material to be used by, or become representative of, other entitles. Trademark law, however, obligates mark holders to aggressively defend the uniqueness and unapportionable nature of their logos and other marks. Failing to properly vet your logo in the marketplace could cause you to lose all rights to it—and worse.

Learn more about protecting your digital assets. Download our free digital asset management best practices guide.

Before you build a brand style guide for a new or recently changed brand, engage an intellectual property to ensure the originality of your logo and other protectable brand elements. Trademark law falls under the domain of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. As such you’ll usually find attorneys who specialize in trademarks listed under “patent law.”

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suitcase-fusion-7-iconI recently gave a webcast about font management fundamentals. We had hundreds of people attend, and I got far more questions than I had time to answer during the webcast.

I got a variety of questions about Extensis font managers, and I thought that I’d take a minute to answer some of the specific questions that I got at this webcast that I didn’t have a chance to answer.

If you have other questions, please don’t hesitate to enter them in the comments below and I’ll do my best to answer them for you!

 

Do I need to separately install my fonts if I’m using a font manager?

The basic function of any font manager is the management of fonts outside of your system fonts folder (if it doesn’t do this, it isn’t a font manager). With Suitcase Fusion and other Extensis font managers, you only need to add your fonts to the product itself, and not mess with the system font locations.

A good font manager like Suitcase Fusion also allows you to deactivate or override fonts in your system folders, so you don’t even need to remove fonts that you’ve already placed in those locations if you don’t want to.

 

When are updates required and how do I get them?

The most important thing with software you use in your daily work is having it work consistently. Maintaining compatibility with your Operating System and associated professional design applications is critical. This is why we strive to keep our software compatible with the newest releases from Apple, Microsoft, Adobe and Quark. We will have compatibility releases for our current products typically within days or weeks of updates from our partners.

To check whether your software is compatible, check the Suitcase Fusion product compatibility page for details.

 

How does Suitcase Fusion interact with Adobe Typekit?

Adobe Typekit is integrated into your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription. This subscription allows you to download, or “sync,” fonts to your desktop from Typekit. Once synced to your machine, these fonts are automatically activated and available to your other applications.

Suitcase Fusion automatically detects when you’ve synced new fonts to your machine and displays them in a separate font library. You can preview, sort and search on these fonts like any other in Suitcase Fusion. You are not able to disable Typekit fonts with Suitcase Fusion. They are active until you choose to “unsync” them using the Typekit online interface.

 

What plug-ins are available and are there plans for additional application support?

Suitcase Fusion currently supports the major design applications from Adobe and Quark. Basically, Suitcase supports Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, InCopy, After Effects and QuarkXPress. For details about which versions of these apps are supported, see the compatibility page.

We continually monitor which applications are in use in the professional design community and actively track requests for plug-in based font activation. If you have an application that you’d like to request this type of support, please feel free to enter it in the comments below.

 

Why do I need to login to use Suitcase Fusion?

For Suitcase Fusion, we’ve done away with serial numbers and in their place, we’ve tied your version of Suitcase Fusion to our servers. This allows you to take advantage of the TypeSync technology for syncing your fonts between machines using our cloud technology. You also no longer need to enter cumbersome numbers to validate that you own the product. It’s all just tied to your account.

 

Support questions

If you are seeing something in your application that isn’t functioning as you expect, please don’t hesitate to contact our technical support team. It’s free and they’ve seen it all. If you do run into something new and unexpected, we are also better able to identify and fix the issue in an future update.

Contact the Extensis support team by either calling them directly:

  • North America: 800-796-9798, Option 3
  • Outside North America: +44 (0) 1604-654-270

Or if you’d rather not wait, login to your account and fill out this form and the team will get back to you as soon as possible.

Ready to upgrade?

If you’re running without a font manager, or with an out of date old one, maybe it’s time to upgrade? Check out the current version of Suitcase Fusion. It’s a worthy upgrade.

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