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We’re happy to announce that over the next few weeks, we’ll be posting brand new videos on the blog. They contain a full tutorial for Suitcase Fusion as well as a number of helpful tips about effective font management with Suitcase Fusion.

This series is presented by graphic arts consultant, Chuck Weger in an accessible, easy-to-understand way. Chuck has been active in the graphic arts field for decades, and is best known as the inventor of the “preflight” concept, now a standard in the publishing world.

To get things started, we’re publishing the first four videos in the tutorial series.

Suitcase Fusion Tutorial #1
Introduction to Suitcase Fusion

Suitcase Fusion Tutorial #2
Font format types – PostScript, TrueType, OpenType and dfont

Suitcase Fusion Tutorial #3
Font locations – Where, oh where, have my little fonts gone?


Suitcase Fusion Tutorial #4
Resolving font conflicts


In future weeks we’ll be publishing all of the videos in the series. Don’t worry about sifting through the blog to find all of the past videos. Like all of our past audio, we will add the videos to a special page of this blog. In addition, when we reach the end of this tutorial series, we’ll one beefy video that contains the entire series in one fell swoop.


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Here’s another Suitcase font management advertisement from way back in y2k (betcha never thought you’d see that abbreviation again!). It’s fun to dig though the archives, so as we unearth more fun, we’ll be sure to share.
Suitcase 8 advertisement


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Quark Symposium 2007Today we announced our sponsorship of the Quark Symposium 2007 Conference Series. This North America series includes presentations, product demonstrations and hands-on training for Quark products.

The free symposium features sessions for designers, production managers, and output providers. You can participate in sessions covering design best practices, typography and color management.

Here are the dates and locations of the tour:

  • New York, Metropolitan Pavilion, May 9, 2007
  • Montreal, Hyatt Regency, May 16, 2007
  • Houston, Hyatt Regency, June 6, 2007
  • Orlando, World Marriott, June 19, 2007
  • Los Angeles, Westin Bonaventura, June 28, 2007
  • Chicago, Navy Pier, October 30, 2007

For conference registration and more info:
http://www.quark.com/about/events/symposium/

This symposium is FREE to attend, so check it out.


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Love Hate Helvetica Contest

Much like our earlier haiku contest, Veer is running a Love/Hate Helvetica contest over on their blog. They have a good bounty of prizes, and apparently they don’t have many entries, so I’d like to encourage you to drop them a line. It looks like you might have a very decent chance of winning. Maybe you can use your poetry skills to whip up a good sonnet or haiku – I’m willing to bet that they won’t hold you to the bonds of iambic pentameter.

The deadline is next Monday, May 7th, so get hoppin’!


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Mexican Blackletter bookNot too long ago, we featured a new book from Cristina Paoli called Mexican Blackletter. The book explores the widespread use in Mexico of the blackletter family of typefaces in Mexico.

I’m happy to see that Ms. Paoli has continued to get exposure for her work, and was recently interviewed by Marco Werman on PRI.

For more information or for purchase information, check out the publisher’s site: Mark Batty Publisher.


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Tech Support Rep, Pete Soloway modeling the Helvetica Film t-shirt I think the answer is a resounding ‘no one’. Seems people are always clamoring for something free. I’m not really sure it matters WHAT is being given away (there is Portland, Oregon-owned store chain that does an annual promotion for…wait for it…. free MEAT.) Perhaps we could do an interesting psychological experiment. Perhaps a 20-pound tuna giveaway?

Anyway, it seems everyone loves to ‘win’ something….and in honor of the wonderfully fun (and funny) Helvetica Documentary that premiered here this weekend- we’re giving away a few HELVETICA t-shirts. Just post a comment about what you like best about the film. We’ll choose two lucky winners of shirts (and no, a tech support representative is not included with your prize.)
Also- Don’t miss this really fun kerning contest. You have to be a real type geek perhaps to win this…but should be fun just trying. It sounds easy enough, which should make you think twice. You could win a $250 gift certrificate to Veer. Submission details are below:

“As perfectly as you know how, set the headline THE SOUND AND THE FURY in Futura Bold, all caps, at 50pts on a single line, in black type on a white background. Then export it as 72dpi jpg or png image and send it to susan at coudal dot com with the phrase “Futura Perfect” in the subject line.”

Don’t forget to send us you feedback on HELVETICA for a chance to win a T.


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Helvetica Film

Last night I was fortunate enough to attend the Portland premier screening of Director, Gary Hustwit’s new film, Helvetica. This was the last night, and concluding film of the PDX Film Fest.

When I arrived at Portland’s historic Hollywood Theatre, I was pleased and somewhat concerned to see that there was a huge crowd waiting to attend the premier. After quite considerable line confusion, I was able to secure one of the last of about 1000 seats in the theatre. According to Gary it was by far the biggest audience that he’s ever had for a screening of this film, and from the look of those unfortunate souls who couldn’t make it into the sold-out showing, it could have been even larger!

In a town that’s known for its film geeks, I’m willing to bet that this was a somewhat untraditional festival audience, primarily consisting of graphic designers (about half of the audience) as well as a good number of people associated with Extensis – employees, customers and press contacts.

So, now if you’re like me, you might have originally thought, “What could be so interesting that we need an entire film about a typeface?” Well, let me tell you, there’s plenty. The film is an effective entre into the world of graphic design, and has a number of incredibly funny moments. It amazed me that people could have such passionate feelings about something like this.

The film alternates between interviews and montages of Helvetica in use. According to Gary, the montages, backed with instrumental interludes, were the original building blocks for the film. He first conceived the film while walking around New York and London while listening to his iPod. It’s during these montages that you’re able to get the feeling about how ubiquitous Helvetica is in the world around us.

While Gary interviews the original Swiss creators, as well as many of Helvetica’s biggest fans, including Massimo Vignelli, by far the most entertaining parts of the movie are the segments focusing on the typeface’s detractors. Erik Spiekermann rails against it as being “fat in the middle” and even goes off onto a tangent about the great Microsoft vs Apple debate.

Portland designer, and self proclaimed “bad guy” of the film David Carson was hilarious in the film as well as during the Q&A after the show. Carson could easily be considered the Jack Nicholson or Hunter S. Thompson of the design world. There’s a great point in the movie where he talks about setting an entire interview for Raygun magazine with Bryan Ferry in Zapf Dingbats because he felt that the interview was a snoozefest, and wasn’t really worth reading anyway.

If you’re able to do so, definitely check out one of the screenings in a theatre. It’s great to hear what others find funny, and there were more than a few graphic designer inside jokes. If you’re not able to do so, Gary indicated that the DVD would be released somewhere in the September 2007 time frame.

Oh, and one last thing. I’ve got a few Helvetica t-shirts to give away. Describe your favorite part of the film was in the comments, and I’ll choose a couple of the best comments to receive t-shirts.


Web-based font tools

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The Halstead York CompanyFormer Extensis product manager, and now consultant Halstead York has an interesting blog post about web-based font applications.

Halstead’s blog, Warning: convergence in progress covers everything from film & video, typography and how emerging technologies play into the mix. Check it out.


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Hypatia Sans ProWe reported not too long ago about the two new typefaces from Adobe that come with Adobe Creative Suite 3, Arno Pro and Hypatia Sans Pro. Arno is one of the fonts that are installed with the product, and Hypatia Sans is provided as a bonus for registering the suite.

Adobe recently put up pages on their site that give you an overview of the new fonts:

Adobe has been doing the registration incentives since the inception of the Creative Suite model:


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WIRED logo

The Wired blog, The Underwire, recently posted a short introduction into the science of kerning. If you’re a graphic designer, typographer, or work in the printing industry, all of this will likely be pretty basic for you. But, if you’re trying to describe some of the issues that you regularly encounter to your Aunt Marge, this is an accessible and easy to understand basic description to reference.


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