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Helvetica is one of the world’s most recognizable typefaces. Originally named Neue Haas Grotesk, Helvetica was created in 1957 by designer Max Miedinger with input from Eduard Hoffman (its name was changed 4 years later when it was licensed by Linotype). Helvetica quickly rose to prominence because of its legibility and versatility. 50 years later, it’s still going strong. In 2007, Gary Hustwit released a critically-acclaimed feature-length documentary (called “Helvetica”) about its impact and influence on the world of design.

But familiarity often breeds contempt.

Erik Spiekermann said “People use Helvetica because it’s ubiquitous. It’s like going to McDonalds instead of thinking about food.”

Wolfgang Weingart went a step further: “Anyone who uses Helvetica knows nothing about typefaces.”

Other well-known designers were not quite as harsh.

Steff Geissbuhler called Helvetica “still the most versatile, classic, and readable of all typefaces.”

And Hamish Muir joked that “We hate to like Helvetica.”

So…if you’re a designer, you might be looking for fonts like Helvetica that aren’t so overused. Good news! Our friends at Identifont, Fontspring, Typewolf, and MyFonts recommended several similar grotesk sans-serif typefaces that we’ve assembled here to help you broaden your design pallette:

Nimbus Sans

Created by the URW++ foundry in 1995 as an alternative to Helvetica, Nimbus Sans serves as an effective Helvetica doppelgänger.

Identifont did a side-by-side comparison of the two. Have a look for yourself!

Fonts Like Helvetica: Nimbus Sans

Fonts Like Helvetica: Nimbus Sans

Pragmatica

Inspired by Helvetica, Pragmatica was designed at ParaType (ParaGraph) in 1989 by Vladimir Yefimov (later styles were developed by Olga Chaeva, Alexander Tarbeev, and Manvel Shmavonyan with participation from Dmitry Kirsanov).

Again, practically identical to Helvetica and Nimbus Sans.

Fonts Like Helvetica: Pragmatica

Fonts Like Helvetica: Pragmatica

Volkart

Designed by Jeremie Hornus, Volkart is a Latin-script typeface that was published by Indian Type Foundry in 2015.

Fonts Like Helvetica: Volkart

Fonts Like Helvetica: Volkart

Looking for some options that aren’t so close to the vest? Richard Turgeon wrote this great piece about Helvetica alternatives that feel “modern, classic, and universal” without being quite so similar.

His recommendations:

Stag Sans (Commercial Type)

Open Sans (Google Fonts)

Avenir (Linotype)

Theinhardt (Optimo)

Proxima Nova (Mark Simonson)

Effra (Jonas Schudel)

Aktiv Grotesk (Bruno Maag)

Brown (Lineto)

LFT Etica (TypeTogether)

Franklin Gothic URW T (URW++)

News Gothic  (Bitstream)

So there you have it—several typefaces that are remarkably similar to Helvetica and a few that deviate a bit but still serve the same purpose.

Want to know more about which typefaces are currently the “most loved” or “most hated” by experts in the design industry? Check out James Kidwell’s informative and entertaining Trends In Typography Survey.

 


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Typographic terminology is sometimes very specific, and the nuances can be confusing. Understanding the distinctions will enable you to communicate more clearly, typographically speaking, and help you to make the best use of your fonts and software.

Character vs. glyph: A character is the symbol representing an individual letter, numeral, punctuation, sign, symbol, accent, or other elements in a typeface. A glyph is the actual representation of that character.

Several glyphs may represent one character, such as the lowercase a being represented by the default lowercase a, swash version, small cap, and superior a.

The lowercase a is represented by these four glyphs in Adobe Garamond Premiere Pro: default glyph, swash alternate, small cap, and superscript a.

The lowercase a is represented by these four glyphs in Adobe Garamond Premiere Pro: default glyph, swash alternate, small cap, and superscript a.

 

Typeface vs. font: A typeface is all the letters, numbers, punctuation, and other signs and symbols of a language system designed in a particular style.

A font (in today’s digital world) is a complete character set of a particular weight and style of a typeface in digital form. It is the delivery mechanism of a typeface, and is considered software.

Each font consists of one digital outline for every glyph, which then can be scaled to any size. In the days of metal type, a font was one version of a typestyle in one particular size. A typeface would then consist of many fonts, one for each size: thus Caslon Regular 10 point was one font, while every other size was considered a different font. 

 

Italic vs. oblique: Italics are a slanted typestyle most commonly designed as a companion to a roman, or upright version.

It is usually a unique and separate design, and is often somewhat calligraphic in nature. Oblique refers to a slanted version of its upright companion with few or no design changes other than the angle. (A proper oblique is designed by the typeface designer, and not slanted by a computer command.)

Although these two terms have slightly different meanings, not all typefaces apply the technically correct term. For instance, in the many versions and rereleases of Helvetica, one can see both italic and oblique used for the name of the same design.

The difference between italic and oblique is apparent when set next to their upright companion.

The difference between italic and oblique is apparent when set next to their upright companion.

There are some exceptions to the rules, such as these two versions of what seems like the same typeface, but each actually has a different name: the Italic being the OpenType version, while the Oblique being the Type1 version.

There are some exceptions to the rules, such as these two versions of what seems like the same typeface, but each actually has a different name: the Italic being the OpenType version, while the Oblique being the Type1 version.

 

Slash vs. fraction bar: The slash (aka forward slash) is a diagonal line going from upper right to lower left, occasionally extending slightly below the baseline.

It is easily found on the keyboard, and is frequently used in numerical dates as in 1/25/58, as a substitute for a conjunction such as in East/West and Y/N, math and ratios, and URLs.

The fraction bar is also a diagonal line, but it is on a more extreme angle, and extends from the cap height to the baseline, and not above or below as do some slashes. It is designed specifically for diagonal fractions, and thus its width and weight is sensitive to each typeface design. 

The differences between the forward slash (left) and fraction bar (center) are clearly seen in Chaparral Pro.

The differences between the forward slash (left) and fraction bar (center) are clearly seen in Chaparral Pro.

 

Diagonal vs. nut fractions: Diagonal fractions are those where the numerator and denominator are separated by a diagonal stroke (usually a fraction bar), while nut fractions, also called stacked or vertical fractions, are those where the top and bottom numerals are separated by a horizontal line.

Diagonal fractions are used for proportions, ratios and percentages, while nut fractions are frequently used in – but not limited to – math and scientific formulas.

A diagonal and a nut, or vertical fraction are shown above.

A diagonal and a nut, or vertical fraction are shown above.

 

 

Kerning vs. tracking: Kerning in the digital world is the addition or reduction of space between a pair of characters to improve the overall balance and consistency of the spacing.

Tracking, on the other hand, is the digital term for the addition or reduction of spacing between a range of characters.

This can be used to improve the overall spacing of a font at a particular size, or to create the appearance of a more open, letterspaced look, usually reserved for a brief, all cap setting.

Kerning alters the spacing between two characters, while tracking affect a range of characters.

Kerning alters the spacing between two characters, while tracking affect a range of characters.

 

Widow vs. orphan: A widow is a word, hyphenated word, or several short words that appear at the end of a paragraph.

They are considered undesirable in fine typography as they create a visual hole, whether they appear in-between two paragraphs, or on the bottom of a column of type.

An orphan, on the other hand, is similar, in that it too is a word, hyphenated word, or several short words, but appearing at the top of a column.

Orphans also create a visual hole in a line of type, resulting in a disturbance of the alignment and symmetry at the top of one or more columns. Both should be checked for towards the end of a project, and fixed if possible, either by altering the line breaks or column width, or by editing the copy to either eliminate the short line, or lengthen it.

Widows and orphans are similar, but appear in different places.

Widows and orphans are similar, but appear in different places.

 

 

Monospaced vs. proportional spacing: A monospaced font is one in which each character has the same total width (the width of the glyph plus the space added to the right and left) as in typewriter type as well as tabular figures.

The width and design of some glyphs are occasionally altered to create a better fit within the fixed width of the font.

Proportional spacing is the spacing used in most typefaces where each character has a unique width in proportion to the shape of each glyph.

. Some characters in a monospaced font (upper) might be altered to better fit the fixed width, such as the m and i in the upper showing. Proportional fonts (lower) have more even, balanced spacing.

. Some characters in a monospaced font (upper) might be altered to better fit the fixed width, such as the m and i in the upper showing. Proportional fonts (lower) have more even, balanced spacing.

Copyeditor vs. proofreader: A copy editor checks the text for accuracy, clarity, usage, consistency of style, as well as house style, if a requirement. This is most often done at the beginning of the design and typesetting process.

A proofreader is generally the last person to check the text before (and sometimes after) it goes into final production, whether it be print or digital media.

It usually consists of checking for spelling, grammar and tense, syntax, punctuation, extra spaces, and sometimes font size, styling, and other characteristics.