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Ahh the magic of a little bit of edge detection and a little scripting. This fun little online tool takes any image, detects the edges in the image, and then places whatever text you want along those edges. Pretty fun little tool to noodle around with, that’s for sure! Check out the Textorizer.

Textorizer Extensis Logo


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Funnel, Inc has created a very fun infographic that visually displays all of the steps in the book publishing process at Webcrafters Inc. It’s a great example of how a graphic imagery combined with good planning and tight writing can make a long process easily understandable.

funnelinc_factory500


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We haven’t done one of these in quite some time, so it’s about time we got back to it.

I love to see how people use typography in signage. It’s an area where companies can quickly identify their brand, and communicate a lot about themselves in a few short letters.

I’ve always found Seattle to be a very forward leaning city that is frequently on the cutting edge of design, fashion, food and architecture. I took a few pictures of signage during a recent trip there. Enjoy!

01_VAIN_typography

04_VENTANA_typography

06_HOTELANDRA_typography

09_LOLA_typography

07_MOORETHEATRE_typography08_MOORETHEATRE_type2

02_OTTICA_typography

03_GIANDECARO_typography

05_LAFONTANA_typography

10_tile_typography


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Ban Comic Sans 2You know that a topic has gone full circle when it bubbles up into the mainstream. It took a while before the technologies of blogging and Twitter hit the mainstream. Now, they are both commonly used by individuals, corporations and beyond. I suppose that though time and exposure, any topic can bubble up beyond those with a special interest into the mainstream.

That’s exactly what has happened to the debate surrounding the typeface Comic Sans. Yup, the ubiquitous font that’s on all of our Windows machines, that has long been the subject of debate with design-nerds, is now a topic that you can chat over with your family at the dinner table. It’s been codified in the Wall Street Journal, so you have our permission to argue its merits with Uncle Bob at the family reunion. You can even point him to any of the myriad of websites that publicly express their love or disdain for it. For example:

Heck, check out the response that a design blog got for their April Fools day joke of changing all of the type on their site to Comic Sans.

Maybe you can even convince someone that Comic Sans is an expression of the “evil of typographic ignorance.” And while you’re at it, feel free to let them know how much a font manager like Suitcase Fusion 2 could help manage the thousands of other fonts that they’ll be using instead of Comic Sans.


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DAM up and to the rightIn uncertain times, we’re all more vigilant about where we spend out money. If you’re like me, you probably ask yourself many times a day if you can afford one purchase or another. From small purchases like your daily coffee all the way up to whether now is the time to replace your car or move to a new house, you want to make the best decision possible.

When investing in your business, you probably use many factors, not the least of which is how much time and money a purchase is likely to cost as well as add value.

Aberdeen research published a study that identifies the top technologies that best-in-class companies are currently implementing in response to the economic downturn. The list includes many tools that you’ve probably been using for years. as well as many that you’ve probably considered. They include:

  1. Email marketing software
  2. Lead management software
  3. Digital asset management software
  4. Marketing dashboards
  5. Marketing automation software

Digital asset management (DAM) systems were found to be a critical component of successful companies. In plain terms, the study found that companies who use DAM software outperformed companies who did not, and that performance translated into significant cost savings.  There were a variety of reasons for the improvement, including:

  • Elimination of repetitive tasks
  • Decreased speed in asset location
  • Centralization of content
  • Increased access to assets by all users, including those who work remotely

So, while you may have considered holding back on your purchases, doing so now may just be holding you back.

For more complete details about all of the recessionary marketing tools, I highly recommend reading the following article over at Ecommerce Times.


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Kinetic typography has been all the rage lately. And while this isn’t exactly the same as other videos, it does show how prolific and extensive the creative use of typography has become.

Now that it’s trickled down to the kid-consumer level, I wonder what other projects will soon include the extensive use of type? Perhaps baby bottles?


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I’ve found myself thinking about advertising lately. No, I don’t produce any physical ads myself, nor do I place ads for our company. Thinking about ads is a rare beast for me. Like most consumers in the US, I’m awash in advertising from the moment I wake up until I return my head to the pillow. So, when something rises above the noise to make me smile, or even better, make me think about it long after I’ve seen the ad, I’d call it a success.

Two pieces have have struck me within the last 24 hours. Ironically they were both in an advertising medium that I tend to regard with little respect. I view billboards and outdoor advertising as astronomers view light pollution – an annoyance that makes me relish my time in the woods.

The first ad is a simple logo design on brown background that says “Slay dragons with Sir Snacksalot.” The words are set in distinctive typeface on a white background that is framed by a red line. Nowhere on the ad does it mention the product name, yet it’s immediately apparent which product is being advertised. How’s that for the power of a typeface?

Slay dragons with Sir Snacksalot, Snickers advertisement

It’s the multilayer thought process that made this effort sink in for me. After figuring it out, my thoughts immediately jumped to thinking how impressed I was that the corporate client approved the ad. My applause also goes out to the guys who created this masterpiece. I’m sure that there were no end of nay-sayers in the process, and that impressed me even more. Perhaps some of the negatrons might have said:

  • “You can’t do that! You need the product name!”
  • “Nobody will understand that it’s for a candy bar.”
  • “Most of our consumers are kids. And the younger generation doesn’t like to think, right?!”
  • “What’s up with the dragon? That’s too Dungeons and Dragons for me.”

The second piece was more of a clarification of corporate slogan. From my childhood, I remember television ads for the company Sara Lee. To be honest, I don’t remember any of the products specifically, but I remember their tagline song that played at the end of every commercial. What I thought the lyrics were saying was “Nobody does it like Sara Lee!” The reality of the lyrics were brought home to me on my sleepy morning drive to work on the side of a Sara Lee company van. The real slogan “Nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee!” drove by me this morning and even got my un-caffeinated brain going. They could have chosen the straightforward “Everybody likes Sara Lee!” but instead, they went with a double negative that rhymes with the positive phrase that I misheard. Pure genius that probably took some courage to accept at it’s initial inception.

So, turns out if you wanna get me, you’ve gotta catch me intellectually.

Have a favorite ad or slogan that’s made you think? Tell me know about it!


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As a marketer, I appreciate the coordination, timing and attention to detail that went into this ‘product launch’. Because, honestly, that’s what it is. The Obama administration is re-branding our government. Or at least that appears to be their plan.

Just hours ago- almost simultaneous with the swearing in, the static, old-school white house site was ‘Obama-ized’ with a full relaunch, including a White House blog.This is not your (founding) father’s White House.


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Creative director Sol Sender tells the story of conception and birth of the Obama 08 logo, including the strategy behind it, developmental concepts and finalist designs for the identity not chosen by the campaign.


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