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Papyrus was created in 1982 by American designer Chris Costello. An unorthodox font, it blends the graceful and sophisticated Roman letterform with the authentic expertise of a master calligrapher.

We paid homage to one of history’s greatest fonts by substituting it in these four iconic logos.

 

1. H&M

h&m-papyrus

Versatile and widely underused, Papyrus’ distinct margins give H&M’s dressing rooms a sharp and edgy makeover.

 

2. FedEx

fedex-papyrus

The high horizontal strokes in Papyrus’ capital letters prove that it can really deliver on FedEx’s logo.

 

3. AirBnB

airbnb-papyrus

Papyrus’ signature irregular curves furnish AirBnB’s logo with an expressive, lived-in feel. A great fit for a startup offering contemporary accommodations.

 

4. Chanel

chanel-papyrus

The hand-drawn outline of this reimagined logo highlights Papyrus’ distinctive antique look—one that high fashion brands such as Chanel desire.

Happy April Fools Day from all of us at Extensis!


When Typography Talks

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“THE SECRET OF TYPE IS THAT IT SPEAKS.” – French Poet Paul Claudel

 

Ever noticed how there’s something about emboldened Helvetica that makes you immediately shut your mouth and pay attention like a berated schoolchild? Or how Comic Sans makes your cheeks burn in mild embarrassment like your goofy and slightly tipsy uncle does when giving a toast at a dinner party?

Seasoned graphic designers and typographers are rolling their eyes as they read this, but from the perspective of an observer with no formal education on the matter, misused type is akin to someone talking on the phone in the next bathroom stall—impossible to ignore and mildly offensive.

When Typography Talks

 

The bare bones of it: identifying the ‘mood,’ the ‘flavor,’ or ‘feeling’ of a typeface starts with three things: classification, letter structure, and context. By no means is this a comprehensive list, and a well-educated graphic designer is keeper of sophisticated, nuanced insight into type choice, that’s what makes her a pro!

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It’s that time of the year. The season during which your college basketball friends are nowhere to be seen, and you have to field 1,000 questions a day at work about your nonexistent bracket. Hello, March Madness.

March Madness: The Best & Worst Logos

The 2016 March Madless Final Four logo: yikes.

 

Flash back to the Super Bowl, and we are again reminded that the people yelling at the TV and those of us that identify as creatives have a hard time finding common ground in March. So, in the spirit of splitting the difference, we decided to dissect college basketball logos. (Can you tell we’re opinionated?) We’ll be rustling up some ruckus on twitter with #MarchMadness if you feel so inclined to chime in.

Rewind: it’s hard to skip over the NCAA logo itself before we crap-talk the busy, messy logos that are sprinkled about the road to the title.

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It’s no secret that there’s a stereotypical disjunction between die-hard American football fans and graphic designers. That’s just the type of human variety that keeps the world turning. What we didn’t realize, however, is this disjunction is more like a gaping, massive chasm when it comes to Super Bowl logos.

We don’t at all mean to offend any designer that has ever tread near a football field. We just intend to raise a pointed eyebrow at those responsible for the Super Bowl logos over the years—and we do this by first dissecting the makings of a good logo, or rather an effective logo.

  1. It’s unique
  2. It’s timeless
  3. It’s appropriate
  4. It’s simple
  5. It’s functional

It would be a race to the bottom if these logos were scoring touchdowns based on typography and graphic design merit.

Amidst the joking and poking fun, however, a welcome reprieve came with our discovery of the evolution of the AFC, NFC and NFL logos over the years. After 40 years, updates were made to all three not more than a decade ago.

 

The Evolution of the AFC, NFC, & NFL Logos

The History of Crappy Super Bowl Logos
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The Golden Globes are upon us! This American accolade is known for being a precursor to the Oscars and this year, the Hollywood Foreign Press’ picks are diverse and surprising—making for a murky season.

Confession: surveying the nominees, and waiting for winner announcements is much less interesting to us than noting logo design, title screens, poster design, typography treatments, creative inspiration and who the creators are. Maybe we’re still a bit offended that a film that won Best Drama Motion Picture used Papyrus as its primary font (cough, Avatar, cough).

Either way, we’ve put each of the 2016 nominees in our version of the hot seat, and have doled out fake awards to honor excellence in typography and graphic design.

The Typography & Design Award Goes To…

Before we got to any of this year’s nominees, we dissected the Golden Globe logo. Avant Garde is a font family based on the logo font used for the Avant Garde magazine, which was originally designed by Herb Lubalin. It was purportedly created to capture “the advanced, the innovative, and the creative”—and proved a natural choice for an awards event that honors the same things. We think it’s got some weird imbalance. What are your thoughts?

Now on to the main event.

 

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“When typography is on point, words become images.”
― Shawn Lukas

Much has been going on with typography in our world lately. We released our 2015 Type Trends survey and also made some typography predictions for 2016 with some help from our friends Laura Worthing and Sara Hyndman.

One of our absolute favorite things to do is work with talented graphic designers from around the globe to inspire your type. Not only do we have a robust collection on our Fontspiration Pinterest board, but we also feed these inspirational pieces into the Fontspiration panel within Suitcase Fusion, as well as in our free Fontspiration app for iPhone.

Without further ado, we present our most recent set of custom-made Fontpirations. These pieces feature type by Rvq Type Foundry, Type Faith Fonts, Mika Melvas Type Studio, Letterhead Fonts, Lost Type Co-Op, DSType Foundry, and House Industries. Check ’em out.

Fontspiration: 90% Of Design Is Typography

 

Foundry: RVQ Type Foundry
Font: Brilliants
Artist: Kristina Cancelmi
Inspiration: 2015 marks the 21st Annual Santacon celebration. Background Santas are made from the letterforms for ultimate coolness!

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The day has come! Creative professionals, workgroups everywhere, and their font caches rejoice! We’re serving up Universal Type Server 6 with a slew of new features designed to tame your tangle of fonts, up your creative workflow, and keep more cash in your pocket.

Universal Type Server 6 Is Here!

Universal Type Server 6 now is compatible with Adobe After Effects, Apple OS X El Capitan, Microsoft Windows 10 and Adobe Creative Cloud 2015—and you can demo it for 30 days on us. Read on, and snag unprecedented insight into your organization’s font usage.

Universal Type Server 6 Is Here! Continue Reading »


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Make Fun Holiday Cards to Impress Friends & Family

There’s nothing that’s gives us the warm-and-fuzzies like holiday-inspired typography. And there’s no denying that holiday cards for friends and family are more impressive with custom typography and animation. So when you find yourself hanging out waiting for the cookies to come out of the oven, check out our free and user-friendly Fonspiration app (available for iPhone in the iTunes store).

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Thanksgiving Typography

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Tis’ the season for rushed client deadlines and what seems like one thousand requests to “make the logo bigger.” And as per usual, we feel stuck in a never-ending torrent of misused comic sans (seriously, when will people ever learn?)

Somewhere in the middle of it all we realize what’s truly important about what we do as designers. We find that we’re left with a resounding thankfulness for the joy that beautiful typefaces bring to our designerly worlds.

 

As we prep our Thanksgiving table with custom name cards and our attempts to mimic Casey Ligon’s delicious foodie hand lettering, we do our best to remember the reason for the season: giving thanks!

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The Roots of Political Branding

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Our candidates are living in the wake of a political branding revolution. Most everyone is attempting to emulate the powerful simplicity of Obama’s brand strategy after he changed the game forever. Sadly, it seems like no one really hit the mark this time around.

The Roots of Political Branding

Most everyone is attempting to emulate the powerful simplicity of Obama’s brand strategy after he changed the game forever.

 

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